News & Insights

  • Falsely Accusing Someone of Being Gay is Not Defamation Per Se in New York

    Falsely Accusing Someone of Being Gay is Not Defamation Per Se in New York

    Generally, defamation law prohibits someone from making a false statement of fact about a person that harms his or her reputation. Usually, a plaintiff has to prove special damages (the loss of something having economic or pecuniary value) in order to prevail. However, in a claim for defamation per se, the false statements are deemed … Read more

  • Don’t Lie on an Insurance Application or Your Policy May Be Voided

    Don’t Lie on an Insurance Application or Your Policy May Be Voided

    An insurance application typically requires applicants to answer several questions which allow the insurance company to assess whether it will provide insurance and, if so, how much it will charge. Applicants must be careful about how they respond because if they lie or make a “material misrepresentation” they risk losing coverage. It is well-settled law … Read more

  • New York Changes Power of Attorney Form

    New York Changes Power of Attorney Form

    A Power of Attorney form authorizes someone to act as “an agent” (known as an “attorney-in-fact”) of the individual granting the power (the “principal”). An act taken by an agent has the same legal effect as if the principal were the one acting. New York law sets forth certain requirements that must be met for … Read more

  • When Are Condominium Board Members Entitled to Indemnification?

    When Are Condominium Board Members Entitled to Indemnification?

    Many owners of cooperative (co-op) and condominium apartments serve on the Board of their co-op or condominium association as a way to exercise control over how the building is operated. Often, they assume that if they get sued for their conduct as a Board member, that the co-op or condo will pay the legal fees, … Read more

  • Can a Seller Get Consequential Damages From a Home Buyer Who Breaches the Contract?

    Can a Seller Get Consequential Damages From a Home Buyer Who Breaches the Contract?

    The general rule in New York is that consequential damages are not available to a seller of residential real estate when the purchaser breaches the contract of sale. Consequential damages are damages that result from a breach of contract but would not necessarily occur to every injured party; they are due to an injured party’s … Read more

  • When Can a Profitable Corporation be Dissolved?

    When Can a Profitable Corporation be Dissolved?

    In New York, the Business Corporation Law (“BCL”) allows a shareholder who owns 50 percent of a corporation to seek dissolution of the business on various grounds. In a somewhat renowned case in legal circles, litigation between the two shareholders of the law firm Cellino & Barnes, P.C. (the “P.C”) addresses one issue that can … Read more

  • When Is the Statute of Limitations Extended for a Continuous Wrong?

    When someone sues another party, the lawsuit must be filed within a certain period of time after the wrongful act was committed. This is known as the statute of limitations and the period varies depending on the basis of the lawsuit (ex. breach of contract, personal injury, etc.). If a party tries to bring the … Read more

  • When is “Law Office Failure” a Valid Excuse for a Missed Court Deadline?

    When a plaintiff sues and serves papers on a defendant, it starts the clock running on the defendant to respond. A defendant has 20 or 30 days (depending on how service is completed) to either file an answer or otherwise respond to the complaint. If the defendant does neither, the plaintiff will file a motion … Read more

  • Beware of Conditions Placed on a Charitable Gift of Real Property

    When a party gifts real property to a charity, it is not unusual for them to put a condition on the gift in order to ensure the property will be used for a particular purpose. Such conditions will be encompassed in the language of the deed transferring the property. It does not matter how much … Read more

  • Partnership Agreements Govern Partnership Disputes

    As a general principle, where parties have a contractual relationship, the terms of the agreement will govern any disputes. While there may be other laws that apply to the relationship, they may only be applicable where the contract is silent, invalid or some exception exists. The importance of the parties’ agreement in resolving conflicts also … Read more

Don’t Lie on an Insurance Application or Your Policy May Be Voided

Don’t Lie on an Insurance Application or Your Policy May Be Voided

An insurance application typically requires applicants to answer several questions which allow the insurance company to assess whether it will provide insurance and, if so, how much it will charge. Applicants must be careful about how they respond because if they lie or make a “material misrepresentation” they risk losing coverage. It is well-settled law … Read more

When Are Condominium Board Members Entitled to Indemnification?

When Are Condominium Board Members Entitled to Indemnification?

Many owners of cooperative (co-op) and condominium apartments serve on the Board of their co-op or condominium association as a way to exercise control over how the building is operated. Often, they assume that if they get sued for their conduct as a Board member, that the co-op or condo will pay the legal fees, … Read more

Can a Seller Get Consequential Damages From a Home Buyer Who Breaches the Contract?

Can a Seller Get Consequential Damages From a Home Buyer Who Breaches the Contract?

The general rule in New York is that consequential damages are not available to a seller of residential real estate when the purchaser breaches the contract of sale. Consequential damages are damages that result from a breach of contract but would not necessarily occur to every injured party; they are due to an injured party’s … Read more

When Can a Profitable Corporation be Dissolved?

When Can a Profitable Corporation be Dissolved?

In New York, the Business Corporation Law (“BCL”) allows a shareholder who owns 50 percent of a corporation to seek dissolution of the business on various grounds. In a somewhat renowned case in legal circles, litigation between the two shareholders of the law firm Cellino & Barnes, P.C. (the “P.C”) addresses one issue that can … Read more

When Is the Statute of Limitations Extended for a Continuous Wrong?

When someone sues another party, the lawsuit must be filed within a certain period of time after the wrongful act was committed. This is known as the statute of limitations and the period varies depending on the basis of the lawsuit (ex. breach of contract, personal injury, etc.). If a party tries to bring the … Read more

Partnership Agreements Govern Partnership Disputes

As a general principle, where parties have a contractual relationship, the terms of the agreement will govern any disputes. While there may be other laws that apply to the relationship, they may only be applicable where the contract is silent, invalid or some exception exists. The importance of the parties’ agreement in resolving conflicts also … Read more